Custom Medications

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What Are Custom Medications?

img_custom1The preparation, mixing, assembling, packaging, or labeling of a drug or device as the result of a practitioner, patient, pharmacist relationship in the course of professional practice, or for the purpose of or as an incident to, research, teaching, or chemical analysis and not for sale or dispensing.

Why do I need compounding?
Because Some Drugs are:

arrow4 Not Commercially Available.
arrow4 Not Economically Feasible to Manufacture.
arrow4 Tailored to meet the Customer’s Individual’s Needs.
arrow4 Able to be Altered in Flavors and Colors.
arrow4 For a Special Drug Strength or Dose.

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The Art of Compounding

Compounding also includes the preparation of drugs or devices in anticipation of prescription drug orders based on routine, regularly observed prescribing patterns. A customized medication prepared by a pharmacist according to a doctor’s specifications to meet an individual patient need. Pharmacies make medications from scratch using raw chemicals, powders and devices.

Compounding Without Compromise, Highest Quality Compounding!

arrow4 Better equipment
arrow4 Better grade chemicals
arrow4 No shortcuts

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Compounding without compromise

Can Any Pharmacy Compound?
Preparation of these specialized products requires chemicals and equipment that are not available in most pharmacies. Our pharmacists have received extensive additional training in compounding techniques. We have a support network that generates a constant exchange of ideas, innovations and techniques involving compounding, and includes several Ph.D. chemists and pharmacists who can research the feasibility of new formulations.

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Knowledge General

There are several reasons why pharmacists compound prescription medications; yet, the most important one is patient non-compliance. Many patients are allergic to preservatives or dyes, or are sensitive to standard drug strengths. With a physician’s consent, a compounding pharmacist can change the strength of a medication, alter its form to make it easier for the patient to ingest, and add flavor to it to make it more palatable. The pharmacist also can prepare the medication using several unique delivery systems, such as a sublingual troche or lozenge, a lollipop, or a transdermal gel. Or, for those patients who are having a difficult time swallowing a capsule, a compounding pharmacist can make a suspension instead.

tv_buttonOften parents have a tough time getting their children to take their medicine because of the taste. A compounding pharmacist can work directly with the physician and the patient to select a flavoring agent, such as vanilla butternut or tutti-frutti, that provides both an appropriate match for the medication’s properties and the patient’s taste preferences. Compounding pharmacists also have helped patients who are experiencing chronic pain. For example, arthritic patients who cannot take certain medications due to gastro intestinal side effects. Working with their physician, a compounding pharmacist can provide them with a topical preparation with the anti-inflammatory or analgesic their doctor prescribed for them.

Meeting Patient & Practitioner Needs

Compounders focus on meeting special needs. This may involve compounding height/weight-appropriate pediatric medications, injections for impotency, medications for veterinarians in a variety of dosage forms and flavors, alternatives in hormone replacement therapy, or dosage options, such as transdermal gels, when treating hospice patients. The ultimate goal in preparing any of these customized medications is to help the physician and patient achieve a more positive therapeutic outcome.